Collections

The collections currently comprise approximately 12,000 items including about 6,000 books, 450 videos, 5,000 vertical file materials, curriculum resources, journals and newspapers, maps, posters, theses and dissertations, the G.A. (Bud) Mintz special collection, and some archival materials. The collections focus on First Nations in British Columbia, including contextual materials on Canadian First Nations, in addition to issues of national and international interest to First Nations and Indigenous peoples. X̱wi7x̱wa collects materials written from First Nations perspectives, such as materials produced by First Nations, First Nations organizations, tribal councils, schools, publishers, researchers, writers and scholars.


Featured collections

End of Term Spotlight

The end of term is here! As you are finishing up term papers, getting ready for presentations, and studying for final exams, the librarians have rounded up some things to push your assignments to the finish line. If you need help finding a copy of one of these resources, or need help finding other resources, come visit us from 11-3 Monday through Friday for reference help. Whether you’re searching for political science, natural resources, education, or something else, we love searching for you! Check out the linked resources below.

So You Want to Write About American Indians?: a Guide for Writers, Students, and Scholars by Devon Abbott Mihesuah gives an overview of both fiction and nonfiction books written about Indigenous people, and looks at challenges–many from the author’s own experience–that writers should be aware of when writing about this topic. Especially great for creative writing and English classes.

How to Critique Journal Articles in the Social Sciences by Scott R. Harris provides concise step by step tips and suggestions to reading articles written in the social science discipline, and how to spot strengths and weaknesses in research articles. A helpful read for learning to skim research articles and for suggestions on how to write up your own.

Writing Research Papers: a Complete Guide by James D. Lester & James D. Lester, Jr. is a traditional and practical book that will take you from selecting and narrowing down a research topic to formulating data to formatting your final paper. It covers a wide array of discipline and research writing styles.

Learning and Teaching Together: Weaving Indigenous Ways of Knowing Into Education by Michele T.D. Tanaka introduces teachers to an indigenist approach to education. Rather than focusing of theory and discussion, this book looks at how a group of settler teachers were able to respectfully implement Indigenous knowledge into their classrooms.

Therapeutic Nations: Healing in an Age of Indigenous Human Rights by Dian Million is an easy to read and understand book analyzing the way that trauma plays into the history of Indigenous peoples in North America.

Exploring Indigenous Social Justice edited by John G. Hansen, Ph. D is sixteen chapters by nineteen different expert authors on the what, where, and how in Indigenous social justice principles and practices. This book looks at social justice issues through methodology, education, resiliency, and from an international lens.

A Deeper Sense of Place: Stories and Journeys of Indigenous-Academic Collaboration by Jay T. Johnson and Soren C. Larsen looks at the ethical, political, intellectual, and practical meanings of collaboration with Indigenous peoples through a geographical lens of place. Also available online.

Research for Social Justice: A Community-Based Approach by Adje van de Sande & Karen Schwartz is written for students who are interested in exploring community based approaches in their research and their papers, with chapters on beginning research to how to write and present your report.

Doing Respectful Research: Power, Privilege and Passion by Susan A. Tilley focuses on the role power, privilege and passion play into the decisions of what gets researched, who is positioned as a  researcher or a participant and how data are collected, analyzed represented and publicized.

Giving Back: Research and Reciprocity in Indigenous Settings edited by RDK Herman addresses the need for reciprocity in the research process.

A Xwi7xwa Halloween

Looking for some creepy tales and mysteries of things that go bump in the night to celebrate this Halloween time of year? We’ve rounded up some of our favorites here from our collection to help make your Halloween spooktacular!

What We Do in the Shadows written and directed by Jemaine Cement & Taika Waititi is a dark comedy that follows Vulvus, Viago, and Deacon. They are vampires: undead, immortal creatures who stalk the night and search for human blood, preferably virgins.

Skeleton Man by Joseph Bruchac watches Molly who has to rely on her dreams of an old Mohawk story after her After her parents disappear and she is given to a strange “great-uncle.”

Bearwalker by Joseph Bruchac tells the story of Baron Braun when he calls upon the strength and wisdom of his ancestors to face both man and beast to help his classmates who are being terrorized during a school field trip in the Adirondacks.

The Ones that Got Away by Stephen Graham Jones is a collection of thirteen stories that carve down into the body of the mind, into our most base fears and certainties. Spooky alert! 

Dead North: Canadian Zombie Fiction edited by Silvia Moreno-Garcia is a collection of short stories contains a wide range of zombie fiction, from whales who return from the depths to haunt the coast of Labrador to a corpse that is turned into a flesh puppet that then takes part in a depraved sex show.

Brébeuf’s Ghost: a Tale of Horror in Three Acts by Daniel David Moses is set off of Lake Nipissing in 1649, where Christian missionaries are at war with First Nations communities. To make matters worse, Jesuit martyr Jean de Brébeuf has come back from the dead as a ghost to torment both parties.

The Red Power Murders: a DreadfulWater Mystery by Thomas King writing as Hartley GoodWeather features former cop turned photographer Thumps DreadfulWater visiting his hometown of Chinook, but murders and the past still follow him wherever he goes.

Innocent until Proven Indian: a Jesse Crowchild Mystery by Frank LaRue follows recovering alcoholic lawyer Jesse Crowchild and sidekick investigator ex-cop Mike Morningstar as they try to clear the name of Jimmy Greyeyes who is accused of murder.

Death by Dinosaur: a Sam Stellar Mystery by Jacqueline Guest has 14-year old Sam Stellar investigating who stole a dinosaur fossil, and she has a few suspects, including the young hunk of a paleontologist her sidekick and cousin is totally crushing on.

indian country noir edited by Sarah Cortez & Liz Martínez is a collection of regional short story collections that celebrates Native American crime fiction, featuring original work from Lawrence Block, Joseph Bruchac, and David Cole.

Autumn at Xwi7xwa

As the days fill with crisp air and gorgeous foliage, the longer nights are spent with good books–something we love to do here at the library. Whether you’re spending your fall cozied up on the couch with books or outside in nature, we’ve highlighted some great books on food, harvest and land for you to read this Autumn season.

 

Living on the Land: Indigenous Women’s Understanding of Place edited by Nathalie Kermoal and Isabel Altamirano-Jiménez looks at how patriarchy, gender, and colonialism shape the experiences of Indigenous women as both knowledge holders and knowledge producers. Different writers explore the nature and scope of Indigenous women’s knowledge, how knowledge is rootedness in relationships both human and spiritual, and how knowledge is not inseparable from land and landscape.

 

 

 

 

 

Land-Based Education: Embracing the Rhythms of the Earth from an Indigenous Perspective by Herman J. Michell, PhD explores two different land-based educators insights and experiences on connecting learning to the land and environment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ancient Pathways, Ancestral Knowledge: Ethnobotany and Ecological Wisdom of Indigenous Peoples of Northwestern North America by Nancy J. Turner creates and explains a complex understanding of the traditions of use and management of plant resource throughout North America.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Downstream: Reimagining Water edited by Dorothy Christian and Rita Wong showcases artists, writers, scientists, scholars, environmentalists, and activists who examine the shared human need for clean water that is crucial to building peace and good relationships with each other and the planet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food will Win the War: the Politics, Culture, and Science of Food on Canada’s Home Front by Ian Mosby looks at the symbolic and material transforming that food and eating undertook in Canada during the 1940s and those transformations through a profound social, political, and cultural lens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Food sovereignty in Canada: Creating Just and Sustainable Food Systems edited by Hannah Wittman, Annette Desmarais, Nettie Wiebe explores how Canadian agricultural and food policies are contributing to the current global food crisis and community responses to those policies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eating the Landscape: American Indian Stories of Food, Identity, and Resilience by Enrique Salmón touches an array of indigenous farmers who uphold traditional practices in the face of modern changes to food systems  in this personal narrative from the University of Arizona Press.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘We Are Still Didene’: Stories of Hunting and History from Northern British Columbia by Thomas McIlwraith examines Iskut, BC’s transition from subsistence hunting to wage work in trapping, guiding, construction, and service job, and challenges the idealized images of Indigenous Peoples that underlie state-sponsored traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) studies

 

 

 

 

 

 

And just in time for Thanksgiving! Let us know if you make something from our cookbooks for your families this thanksgiving:

 

The Sioux Chef’s Indigenous Kitchen by Sean Sherman with Beth Dooley is a rich cookbook with a delicious introduction to modern indigenous cuisine of the Dakota and Minnesota territories.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Feast for All Seasons: Tradional Native People’s Cuisine by Andrew George Jr. and Robert Gairns features recipes with ingredients from the land, sea, and sky, and focuses on an enduring cuisine that illustrates respect for the environment and the spiritual power that food can have in our lives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aahksoyo’p Nootski Cookbook: Authentic Indigenous Comfort Food by Shantel Tallow & Paul Conley features Blackfeet comfort food like bannock and chili. Aahksoyo’p means “we’re going to eat” in the Blackfoot language.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Nations Recipes: a Selection From Coast to Coast by Gregory Lepine combines traditional Native cooking with historic and currently available ingredients.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hungry Hearts: 13 tales of Food & Love edited by Elsie Chapman and Caroline Tung Richmond is a collection of interconnected short stories that shows the many meanings food can take on beyond mere nourishment in our lives.

 

 

 

 

Orange Shirt Day on September 30

September 30 is an annual day to recognize & raise awareness about the residential school system in Canada, join together in the spirit of reconciliation, and honour the experiences of Indigenous People. Share your support and orange shirt on September 30th with the hashtag #orangeshirtday on social media.

Orange Shirt Day is inspired by Phyllis Webstad’s story. On her first day of residential school, Phyllis’s grandmother gave her a brand new orange shirt . When Phyllis got to residential school, her shirt was taken from her and never returned. The colour orange has always reminded Phyllis of her traumatic experience at residential school.

If you need support during this time (or at any time of year), please consider these resources:

Drop-in counseling at the Longhouse. No appointment needed:

Tuesdays, 1 – 4 pm, with Renée

Wednesdays, 1 – 4 pm, with Michael

Thursdays, 1 – 4 pm, with Leslie

Kuu-us 24hr crisis line:

Adult/Elder Crisis Line: 250-723-4050

Child/Youth Crisis Line: 250-723-2040

Find more information about Residential Schools in our Indian Residential Schools in Canada Research Guide.

Visit the Indian Residential School and Dialogue Centre at UBC. They are open Monday to Friday from 10am-3pm.

Check out the Orange Shirt Day website to read more on the story behind this day of remembrance.

The Museum of Vancouver is offering free admission on Monday, September 30th, for visitors who wear their orange shirt from 10am-5pm. make sure to visit their “There is Truth Here: Creativity and Resilience in Children’s Art from Indian Residential and Day Schools”exhibit. The exhibit focuses on focuses on rare surviving artworks created by children who attended the Inkameep Day School (Okanagan), St Michael’s Indian Residential School (Alert Bay); the Alberni Indian Residential School (Vancouver Island) and Mackay Indian Residential School (Manitoba).

If you are looking for children’s books on residential schools, please look at our Residential Schools Children’s Books List.

Pride at X̱wi7x̱wa Library

Happy Pride UBC!

This year X̱wi7x̱wa Library celebrates pride at your local UBC events, with our Spotlight Series, and featuring our new Two-Spirit research guide!

Visit us on September 6th, 2019 at the Fairview Commons (outside the Earth Sciences Building) and explore queer titles in our collection.

Queer & 2S Books at Xwi7xwa Library

Two-Spirit and Indigenous Queer Studies Research Guide

1. Joshua Whitehead

 full-metal indigiqueerFront Cover Book Cover Jonny Appleseed

Author of Jonny Appleseed (novel) and full-metal indigiqueer (poetry collection). Whitehead is a Two-Spirit Oji-Cree from Treaty 1 territory in Peguis First Nation, MB. For Jessica John’s interview with Whitehead in Room magazine see.

 

Find Joshua Whitehead titles at UBC Library!

 

2. Billy-Ray Belcourt

 This Wound is a World

Author of This Wound is a World and NDN Coping Mechanisms. Belcourt is Cree from the Driftpile Creed Nation. Click for Belcourt on YouTube and their public scholarship.

 

Find Billy-Ray Belcourt titles at UBC Library!

 

3. Daniel Heath Justice

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Cherokee author Daniel Heath Justice writes Indigenous and queer fantasy, weird fiction, creative nonfiction, and  researches Indigenous literary and cultural studies, animal cultural history, gender and sexuality, and speculative fiction. He is also a faculty member at UBC Vancouver.

For CBC North by Northwest interview with Justice see here (begins at 2:07:30).

For Justice’s interview with Black Coffee Poet on Queer Indigenous Literature see here.

Find Justice’s work at UBC Library!

 

4. Sts’iyóye smestíyexw slhá:li

 

NRTF | First Nations Students Scholarships |

Image retrieved from https://www.nrtf.ca/impact/2012-recipient-stories/

Sts’iyóye smestíyexw slhá:li (Twin-Spirited Woman or Saylesh Wesley) is both Stó:lõ  and Tsimshian. In her article “Twin-Spirited WomanSts’iyóye smestíyexw slhá:li” Wesley shares her stories and process of coming into community with the assistance of her grandmother. Wesley, “wishes to revitalize the cultural roles of transgendered/two-spirit people within the Coast Salish territory and ways in which they historically contributed to their societies prior to colonization.” 

In 2017 as a result of transphobia/homophobia in Chilliwack’s community, Peggy Janicki wove a shawl for Sts’iyóye smestíyexw slhá:li and held a ceremony to bring “order and grace” out of “chaos and hurt”; see page 20 of Teacher Magazine.

 

5. Shawnee

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Shawnee is a soul, R&B, pop, and alternative Mohawk Two-Spirit artist. Her music aims to “support, heal, and empower.” Her work has been featured on Disney TV, at NYC Pride, and to support Canada’s suicide crisis.

Although her album has yet to be released, you can still stream it online.

Interested in music? Xwi7xwa has many titles on Indigenous music and artists, CD’s, and more! Here are some helpful tips for navigating our collection:

  • WM = resources organized under call number WM cover topics about music
  • phrase searching “audio cassette” while limiting to Xwi7xwa Library gives you music and language audio
  • search by artist

 

6. Cris Derksen

Orchestral Powwow

Cris Derksen is a classically trained cellist from NorthTall Cree Reserve on her dad’s side and Mennonite on her mother’s side. Derksen’s music is a fusion of classical, traditional, and contemporary.

Although Xwi7xwa Library has yet to buy copies of Derksen’s albums, you can listen to Orchestral Powwow, The Collapse, and The Cusp online.

You can also read more about Derksen here or by searching “Cris Derksen” in Summon or the Catalogue.

If you like Derksen you might also like Jeremy Dutcher!

 

 

7. Continuous by Wiagañmiu (Jenny Irene Miller)

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Wiagañmiu is Inupiaq from Nome, with roots in Kiqigin (Wales, Alaska). Miller identifies as both gay and Two-Spirit and her photography supports the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and Indigenous LGBTQ+ and Two-Spirit communities.

“Continuous is my small answer to the large question: how do we as Indigenous people decolonize our sexualities, genders, and the way we treat individuals who identify outside of the standard binary of male or female? I have replied to that question with this ongoing portrait series featuring members of the Indigenous lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, and Two-Spirit (LGBTQ2) community.”

Miller on instagram: @jennyirenemiller

Read more about Miller in her article The Many Ways We Love from Canadian Art.

 

8. Gender

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Masculindians: Conversations about Indigenous Manhood

Between October 2010 and May 2013, Sam McKegney conducted interviews with leading Indigenous artists, critics, activists, and elders on the subject of Indigenous manhood. In offices, kitchens, and coffee shops, and once in a car driving down the 401, McKegney and his participants tackled crucial questions about masculine self-worth and how to foster balanced and empowered gender relations.

Find me at UBC Library!

 

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Indigenous Men and Masculinities: Legacies, Identities, Regeneration

Innes and Anderson bring together prominent thinkers to explore the meaning of masculinities and being a man within such traditions, further examining the colonial disruption and imposition of patriarchy on Indigenous men. Building on Indigenous knowledge systems, Indigenous feminism, and queer theory, the sixteen essays by scholars and activists from Canada, the U.S., and New Zealand open pathways for the nascent field of Indigenous masculinities. The authors explore subjects of representation through art and literature, as well as Indigenous masculinities in sport, prisons, and gangs.

For CBC Interview with Rob Innes (co-editor) see here.

Find me at UBC Library!

 

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Kent Monkman and Miss Chief

Cree artist Kent Monkman and gender-fluid Miss Chief Eagle Testickle explore topics on colonization, sexuality, loss, and resilience.

For CBC Radio interview see here.

Find resources on Monkman at Xwi7xwa Library!